Muscle Spotlight: The "Deep Six"

So far, we’ve taken a look at the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gluteus minimus muscles and how important they are for the function of the hips, both in terms of stability and motion. There is one more set of muscles tucked away in the pelvis that is usually not addressed unless they start causing problems, though. If you’ve ever had the uncomfortable condition known as sciatica, you won’t want to miss this post!

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Muscle Spotlight: Gluteus Medius and Minimus

If you’ve been reading the blog for the past couple of weeks, you’ll have noticed a bit of a theme. Namely, we’re taking a look at the gluteal muscles, how they’re addressed in massage sessions, and how they have vastly important functions in your day-to-day movement. Last post, we focused on the gluteus maximus, the largest and most powerful of the gluteal muscles. In this post, we’ll see what its associates – the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus – accomplish in the body!

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Muscle Spotlight: Gluteus Maximus

Last week, I posted about gluteal massage being included in massage sessions. I personally believe, as a therapist, that it should be, but I always leave it up to my clients. As clients, you are in control of the session and it can be customized to your needs and desires (within reason, as always), and that means that gluteal massage can be excluded if you prefer that area not be touched. However, once you learn about all the hard work these muscles do for your body every day, you might just reconsider the next time you get a massage! Without further ado, let’s take a look at the gluteus maximus, the largest of the gluteal muscles.

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To Glute Or Not To Glute?

When it comes to the gluteal muscles, or “glutes” as they’re commonly referred to, there is a surprising amount of debate among bodyworkers and clients alike as to whether this area of the body should be included in a regular massage session or not. The buttocks have long been an area that, especially in the U.S., have been seen as potentially erotic in nature, with many people growing up knowing that someone touching their behind is an inappropriate gesture unless that person has express consent to do so. Even when entering massage school, many students fill out paperwork that asks them both if they are comfortable having their gluteals worked on as well as whether they are comfortable working on the gluteals of their fellow students. So should the gluteals have a regular place in your massage sessions, or is it best left out?

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Being Able to Say "No"

For massage therapists especially, one very difficult challenge seems to be the ability to say “no” to a given situation if we need to. We are such giving people that it can be extremely difficult for us to tell anyone that we cannot accommodate their request. Many of us would almost rather not practice than have to do that, but the unfortunate reality is that we have to draw boundaries in and around various parts of our lives and keep those boundaries intact. Otherwise, we risk overextending ourselves and burning out. There are many situations that may call for a therapist to say “no.” The following are some common potential situations therapists may run into as well as ways to help therapists find out if they are in such situations and how best to say “no” while still being professional.

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Why Relaxation Massage Is Being Left Behind and Left Out -- Part 2

Last week’s post was a story of my own which dealt with relaxation massage and how I found that it was my “niche” in the competitive massage world, despite many people having told me that what I offer isn’t enough to keep a massage practice afloat. This week’s post will explore why relaxation massage no longer seems to be emphasized as much in the industry in general and give some insights into how all massage styles as a whole can be better represented to clients and those outside the world of massage.

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Why Relaxation Massage Is Being Left Behind and Left Out -- Part 1

In the next two posts, I would like to address an issue that I’ve been seeing in the massage and bodywork community. That is, the trend of emphasizing medically oriented massage techniques almost to the exclusion of relaxation massage. The next post will talk more about this trend and how it presents in the industry as a whole. In this first post, though, I’ll begin by telling a story of my own to illustrate how it can affect the lives and practices of individual therapists. It has taken a lot of time and consideration to thoughtfully develop these posts, and I hope that others may benefit from reading my story and my insights.

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Tips for Keeping Seasonal Depression at Bay

Today’s guest post about Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) was written by Kimberly Hayes of PublicHealthAlert.info. Read on to find out what this disorder is, whether you might have it, and what steps you can take to help alleviate its symptoms.

“Most of us feel less energetic and upbeat during the winter, when the days are short and the weather is inhospitable. However, for some people, the winter blues are more than a fleeting phase. If you find yourself crippled by low energy and sadness throughout the winter, you may be experiencing a type of depression known as seasonal affective disorder.

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Why Don’t More Doctors Look Into Massage for Clients in Physical Pain?

I got asked an excellent question on Quora the other day regarding massage treatments as viable options for pain relief and why more doctors who treat physical pain don’t suggest massage to their patients. The question read, “Why don't more doctors who treat physical pain in patients look into trigger points or myofascial release as a solution?” Keep reading to find out what I replied.

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