Why Relaxation Massage Is Being Left Behind and Left Out -- Part 2

Last week’s post was a story of my own which dealt with relaxation massage and how I found that it was my “niche” in the competitive massage world, despite many people having told me that what I offer isn’t enough to keep a massage practice afloat. This week’s post will explore why relaxation massage no longer seems to be emphasized as much in the industry in general and give some insights into how all massage styles as a whole can be better represented to clients and those outside the world of massage.

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Why Relaxation Massage Is Being Left Behind and Left Out -- Part 1

In the next two posts, I would like to address an issue that I’ve been seeing in the massage and bodywork community. That is, the trend of emphasizing medically oriented massage techniques almost to the exclusion of relaxation massage. The next post will talk more about this trend and how it presents in the industry as a whole. In this first post, though, I’ll begin by telling a story of my own to illustrate how it can affect the lives and practices of individual therapists. It has taken a lot of time and consideration to thoughtfully develop these posts, and I hope that others may benefit from reading my story and my insights.

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Tips for Keeping Seasonal Depression at Bay

Today’s guest post about Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) was written by Kimberly Hayes of PublicHealthAlert.info. Read on to find out what this disorder is, whether you might have it, and what steps you can take to help alleviate its symptoms.

“Most of us feel less energetic and upbeat during the winter, when the days are short and the weather is inhospitable. However, for some people, the winter blues are more than a fleeting phase. If you find yourself crippled by low energy and sadness throughout the winter, you may be experiencing a type of depression known as seasonal affective disorder.

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Why Don’t More Doctors Look Into Massage for Clients in Physical Pain?

I got asked an excellent question on Quora the other day regarding massage treatments as viable options for pain relief and why more doctors who treat physical pain don’t suggest massage to their patients. The question read, “Why don't more doctors who treat physical pain in patients look into trigger points or myofascial release as a solution?” Keep reading to find out what I replied.

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Tips for Using a Foam Roller

To be frankly honest, I don’t really like foam rollers. Too often, I find that clients or friends will injure themselves by either too aggressively using this tool or simply using it incorrectly. (I mean, honestly, who thought it would be a great idea to put foam spikes on a roller?) I would much prefer that they go see a trained massage therapist or bodyworker who can work with their body to gently encourage it to let go of its adhesions rather than forcing it to do something it may not be ready to do. However, some people have to use their foam roller, whether because they cannot go see a massage therapist regularly or because they consider it a necessary part of their self-care routine, and I respect that. With that in mind, then, here are my tips for using a foam roller effectively and safely.

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The Vocabulary of Massage Therapy

When I had to “fire” my first client, it was due to a unique set of circumstances, largely centered around the language used in text communications with me. He spoke of feeling the “love through my touch” and that he wanted me to “engulf and envelope” him with my “soft and sweet sexy hands.” To his credit, he had been a complete gentleman while in his very first session, and may, in fact, have meant nothing but honest and sincere, if awkward, compliments by the words. But the fact that I had been made uncomfortable, even if unintentionally, by that and other text messages he sent, was enough to cause me to refuse to rebook him. The brand new and still fragile relationship of trust and safety between us had been broken.

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A Response to “Worshiping the False Idols of Wellness”

The New York Times published an article on the first of August which struck quite the cord with me, in both a positive and a negative way. Dr. Jen Gunter, an obstetrician and gynecologist in California, was the author of the piece, which can be read here. She has very obviously had some negative experiences with those in the “wellness” community, as is evidenced by her comments about them and some of the practices with which she associates them. I was honestly torn reading this piece. I acknowledge that Dr. Gunter has some good points about people who take advantage of the uneducated looking for simple health and wellness solutions in their lives. However, she also clearly misunderstands the very meaning of wellness itself as well as the intentions of the vast majority of people in the wellness community.

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An Inside Look at Massage Cancellation Policies

One of the hardest things that massage therapists have to deal with is clients who cancel their appointments, especially when it turns out to be a no-show who has given no notice that they were planning to cancel. It is for this reason that many massage therapists have had to enact cancellation policies for their practices. Some clients are surprised or offended that they will be charged for a missed appointment or last-minute cancellation, since to them it seems only a minor adjustment to the massage therapist’s schedule. In this post, I would like to give people an inside look into the process of setting up a massage room as well as how not showing up for an appointment or cancelling on short notice is truly an inconvenience to your massage therapist.

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